As the weather begins to improve, many homeowners are interested in utilizing their outdoor space more. Hanging a hammock is a popular and relatively easy project you can complete yourself. However, chains can leave nasty scars on innocent trees or even become completely embedded in the trunk. Screwing eye bolts into your trees is also not ideal. Here’s how to hang a hammock without hurting your trees.

Use Hammock Tree Straps

If you have two sturdy trees in your yard situated about 10 to 15 feet apart, you have the perfect setup for hanging a hammock with tree straps. This is the number-one option because tree straps are easily adjustable to the proper length, they won’t damage your trees, and they’re portable so you can take them camping.

Use Rope

If you have a hammock you want to hang right now, but you don’t have tree straps, using a rope is another simple option. You simply need to loop two lengths of sturdy rope around the hammock end-loops and secure them to your trees. It’s low-tech, but it’s easy to do and won’t harm your trees. It’s also a simple trick to use when you go camping. Just make sure you use good knots that won’t come loose and possibly injure the person sitting in the hammock.

Set Up a Hammock Stand

Don’t have two sturdy trees in your yard from which to hang a hammock? Solve your dilemma with a hammock stand. Your best bet is to buy the hammock and stand together to ensure compatibility. There are many different styles to choose from, and once you set it up, your hammock becomes a beautiful, functional backyard addition. With a stand, there’s no need to measure or hassle with straps or ropes, and since it’s mobile, you can reposition your hammock anywhere in the yard.

Drill Hardware into Anchored Posts

You could choose to use hanging hardware on your trees, but this will leave scars in the bark. A better option is to anchor two posts in the soil the proper distance apart to act as a permanent hammock stand. Then, screw eye bolts into the posts to create an anchor point. Two large S-hooks and two lengths of 18-inch chain are the other pieces of hardware your need. Adjusting the hammock tension is a breeze since all you need to do is move the S-hook up and down the chain. Just remember, hanging hardware isn’t portable, so choose the location wisely.

Hang a Hammock Indoors

Whether you’re thinking of installing a hammock in the kids’ playroom or as a replacement for your bed, indoor hammocks are a great way to add a unique place to relax in your home. The same hanging hardware that works well on anchored posts is also ideal for hanging hammocks indoors from the walls or ceiling. Start by drilling pilot holes into studs or beams to ensure a sturdy installation. Then, screw in eye bolts and attach S-hooks and chains. If your hammock needs slack, simply lengthen the chain to help span the distance.

Get Help with Other Outdoor Home Improvement Projects

Now that you know how to hang a hammock, sit back, relax, and let Mr. Handyman tackle the other chores around your outdoor living space. We provide a variety of exterior home services to improve the look of your property, including fence installation, gutter services, power washing, and siding repair. To schedule services with our experienced team, please contact your local Mr. Handyman or call us at (877) 256-3376. We’re here to help with all your home improvement needs!